Flag Counter Singing from the Shadows
Singing from the Shadows

trailrnix:

"Free Shipping and 25% off"

image

”..on all orders of $200 or more”

image

Waterbender for sure.

kaiba-s-giant-dick:

Really? Why water? I’m curious about this. 

I was thinking fire, too, but you since seem to like the ocean (or at least ocean creatures) so much, and seem to be able to adapt and face many different situations, I decided on water.

faeryhearts:


How do you pick up the threads of an old life? How do you go on, when in your heart you begin to understand there is no going back? There are some things that time cannot mend, some hurts that go too deep, …that have taken hold.

— Frodo Baggins, The Lord of The Rings: The Return of The King.

My mother once told me that trauma is like The Lord of The Rings. You go through this crazy, life-altering thing that almost kills you (like, say, having to drop the One Ring into Mount Doom), and that thing by definition cannot possibly be understood by someone who hasn’t gone through it. They can sympathise, sure, but they’ll never really know, and more than likely they’ll expect you to move on from the thing fairly quickly. And they can’t be blamed; people are just like that, but that’s not how it works.

Some lucky people are like Sam. They can go straight home, get married, have a whole bunch of curly-headed Hobbit babies and pick up their gardening right where they left off, content to forget the whole thing and live out their days in peace. Lots of people, however, are like Frodo, and they don’t come home the same person they were when they left, and everything is more horrible and more hard than it ever was before. The old wounds sting and the ghost of the weight of the One Ring still weighs heavy on their minds, and they don’t fit in at home anymore, so they get on boats, and go sailing away to the Undying West to look for the sort of peace that can only come from within. Frodos can’t cope, and most of us are Frodos when we start out.

But if we move past the urge to hide or lash out, my mother always told me, we can become Pippin and Merry. They never ignored what had happened to them, but they were malleable and receptive to change. They became civic leaders and great storytellers; they we able to turn all that fear and anger and grief into narratives that others could delight in and learn from, and they used the skills they had learned in battle to protect their homeland. They were fortified by what had happened to them, they wore it like armour and used it to their advantage.

It is our trauma that turns us into guardians, my mother told me. It is suffering that strengthens our skin and softens our hearts, and if we learn to live with the ghosts of what has been done to us, we just may be able to save others from the same fate.
Sarah Taylor Gibson.

Terra: “You have to stop me, Beast Boy. Please! I don’t wanna fight anymore.”

Beast Boy: “Then don’t let Slade control you anymore.”

Terra: “I have no choice.”

Beast Boy: “That’s a lie! You’ve always had a choice!”

Terra: “…”

Beast Boy: “It’s all been your choice. You chose to work for Slade, chose to betray us, and now you’ve chosen to give him control. Slade isn’t doing this, Terra-YOU ARE!”

Terra: “No!”

Okay, this is important. This right here is the reason why Beast Boy is the best friend that Terra ever had. Yes, he never stopped believing that she wasn’t evil and that there was good in her, but he didn’t let her lie to herself or try to solve her problems for her. He simply told her that she has the power to take back control of her life and make the right choices and that’s what she ended up doing in spades. Even when Beast Boy tried to save her and help her run away from the volcano eruption she caused, she remained and sacrificed herself to fix the mess she made instead of running away again.

Sometimes being a good friend to someone means calling them out on their b.s. and not babying them while still being there for them.

Saying “Serotonin treats depression, therefore depression is, at root, a serotonin deficiency” is about as scientifically grounded as saying “Playing with puppies makes depressed people feel better, therefore depression is, at root, a puppy deficiency”.

(via researchtobedone)

PUPPY DEFICIENCY

(via foundbysara)

The person needs 30,000 CC’s of puppies STAT

(via eldritchsandwich)

opalescunt:

This morning, BuzzFeed is featuring a story from Project Unbreakable (website/Tumblr), who work with survivors of sexual assault, photographing them holding a poster with a quote from their attacker. Today’s unique story uncovered stories from men who have been assaulted, and touches base on some of the stigmas surrounding men and sex, with quotes from attackers such as “Don’t worry, boys are supposed to like this,” and “You’re a guy, you can’t say no to a girl like me.”, as well as many threats to hurt loved ones. Many people still don’t realize that yes, men CAN BE and ARE victims of sexual abuse, not only from women but from fellow men, and that it is not made any less traumatizing for a man simply because he is a man, and saying things like “man up” does nothing except further dehumanize and hurt the victim. There is, if possible, even more blame put on a male victim of sexual abuse than female because people assume that all men want sex, from any person, at any time. Stop this. Stop the abuse of ANYBODY, stop victim blaming, and stop telling male abuse survivors that men being raped “isn’t a real thing.” You can read the full story and see the rest of the pictures here. 

frantzofanon:

大家你好!!! check out my new tattoo!! it means “harmony” in english!!! I can’t wait to start showing white people my tattoo and asking them if they can understand it!!! TFW YOLO! (That’s what they say right?)

frantzofanon:

大家你好!!! check out my new tattoo!! it means “harmony” in english!!! I can’t wait to start showing white people my tattoo and asking them if they can understand it!!! TFW YOLO! (That’s what they say right?)

america-wakiewakie:



We All Are Ferguson! | La Voz
Protesters march and hold their fists aloft as they march during ongoing demonstrations in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri August 16, 2014. Missouri Governor Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency and imposed a curfew in Ferguson on Saturday following a week-long series of racially charged protests and looting over the shooting of the unarmed black teenager by a white police officer.
Let’s Spread the Ferguson Rebellion and put an end to this Police Brutality Epidemic!
It’s been almost two weeks since the murder of 18 year old Michael Brown in  Ferguson, MO erupted into riots & protests against the racist police. Every 28 hours, a Black person is killed by police or other person acting as a vigilante. The Ferguson insurrection has sparked a flame that has only gotten brighter and shows little sign of withering away. It has galvanized not only Missouri, but also people in the U.S. and around the world.  An example that shows the solidarity and connection Ferguson shared with the world are the instances where Palestinians have been giving tips through social media on dealing with the police force’s daily barrage of tear gas and violence. It is no surprise on why the Black working class people and other oppressed sectors are revolted by the brutal nature of the racist police violence that the killing of Michael Brown represent. Though the apartheid-like system of Jim Crow formally ended with the democratic gains of the Civil Rights Movement of the 50s-60s, in reality it only changed its form. There has been a resurgence of a “new Jim Crow”, especially since the 1980s, when Reagan began to defund public education and increase prison incarceration. The US economic recession that started in 2008 has only increased the marginalization and criminalization of black people: unemployment,  poverty,  police brutality, among other things, have been the reality for the majority of the African American population, along with Latinos and other oppressed sectors .
All support and Solidarity with Ferguson protests!
It is no surprise why the response by the Ferguson black community has been large and rebellious. It is a small city with a population of 21,000, where almost 70% of the population is Black and authorities are almost all white. To cite just one example, only three of the 53 city police officers are black. The unemployment rate for black youth (16 to 24 years) is 47%, while for white youth it is 16%.  Moreover, Missouri was the last US state to abolish slavery. These figures start to paint a picture that is shared by the Black and Brown working class communities in most neighborhoods, ghettoes and projects of the nations elsewhere.  In fact, according to a report entitled “Operation Ghetto Storm”, by the  Malcolm X Grassroots Movement (an African Americans grassroots activist organization) “police officers, security guards, or self-appointed vigilantes extrajudicially killed  at least 313  African-Americans in  2012…This means a black person was killed by a security officer every 28 hours.” The militarized attack on the Ferguson protesters also added fuel to the indignation the community and the nation. The first night of the protests faced attack and repression by the local police, but more and more people showed up days/nights after. Protests have gone from hundreds to thousands, with some having more than 7000 people at the demonstrations. Local fast food workers, (who’ve been organizing for the Fight for 15$ minimum wage campaign and for unionization) other labor union members, ministers and church members, students, and many sectors have come out to join the protests in solidarity. St. Louis mayor and Missouri governor called out the National US Guard and put forward a curfew after midnight to repress and try to stop the protests, but the Ferguson people have shown courage in coming out to not be silenced, with the support of activists from other cities and states who came out to Ferguson to fight along. Workers’ Voice / La Voz de los Trabajadores supports Ferguson protests against police brutality and is involved in solidarity initiatives and demonstrations in different cities.
Obama rules for the 1%, not for black and working people!
The racist murder of Michael Brown was unfortunately another in a long series of murders by police or vigilantes in recent years. The two latest cases that shocked national public opinion were Trayvon Martin, murdered by a neighborhood vigilante in Florida in 2012 & Oscar Grant’s murder by police in Oakland in 2010. But there were hundreds of others, including Kendrec McDade (Pasadena, CA 2012), Ramarley Graham (Bronx, New York, 2012), Alan Blueford (Oakland, CA 2012), Andy Lopez (Santa Rosa, CA, 2013), Kimani Gray (Brooklyn, New York 2013) and the list goes on… In 2014 alone, different police forces have killed Ezell Ford (South Los Angeles, CA), Eric Garner (Staten Island, New York), Jacorey Calhoun (Oakland, CA), John Crawford III (Beavercreek, Ohio,), Dante Parker (Victorville, CA), Omar Abrego (South Los Angeles, CA) and Alex Nieto (San Francisco, CA). In most of these cases, murders generated a series of demonstrations at the time, but the murderer tended to be acquitted by the courts and not held accountable. This racist murder epidemic has not decreased since Obama’s election, quite the opposite, it continues to grow showing that the USA is still today a racist country in which Black and Latin@ youth are viewed as “potential criminals” by the white police and ruling class establishment. The protests against such violence also show that Obama’s hold on Black working class other sectors is dwindling, as few still believe today that the President is a “friend of Black folks”. On the opposite, his administration is continuing the war at home and abroad against those who are not, and will not be, considered as equal under capitalism.
For a National Movement Against Police Brutality!
The Ferguson rebellion continues, and we must follow their lead everywhere. We must build a national movement against police brutality. Too often struggles that erupt in response to police brutality are geographically confined to one city or small region. For example, in 1992, the Rodney King riots stayed in California and in 2009, the protests and riots in the wake of Oscar Grant’s murder by Oakland police did not expand beyond Oakland. Police brutality is not a local issue but is the result of a racist state that protects the 1%. Therefore, all of us who are struggling against police violence in our communities must unite with others doing the same in other parts of the country. This is the key to increasing our forces and multiplying our power. A movement that unites youth walking out of high schools, colleges, and universities across the country, and workers doing the same in their factories and workplaces on a national scale is what is needed to make a dent against the state of daily oppression and exploitation that the Black and Brown working class face today. For us socialists, police brutality against Black and Brown are an attack against the working class as a whole- as it keeps us divided and unable to unite in struggle against the 1 %, the ruling class. This became apparent in the Occupy movement that had to struggle with divisions due to race and gender conflicts. In this struggle against the worst manifestations of racism, we must bring into our ranks white, Asian/Pacific Islander, Latin@ and Black workers. In addiiton, we must mobilize the labor unions and demand from the AFL-CIO and the “Change to Win Coalition” to take a real stand against the government´s extreme complicity with police brutality. To build a national movement against police brutality, specifically one with working class independence and a clear anti-racist stand, it would mean reaching out to activists and organizations fighting against police violence in places in all major cities affected by the recent police violence, learning from their struggles, and informing them of ours. But we also need to appeal to all unions and union federations to unite in this fight. To facilitate this process, Workers’ Voice /La Voz de los Trabajadores encourages the idea of holding a National Conference against Police Brutality. With such a conference, we could establish a national network that could distribute information about incidences of police brutality and coordinate strategy and actions against such episodes nationwide.
Stop all Police Brutality! Trial and Punishment for the Michael Brown Murderers! Free all arrested protesters and drop all charges! National Guard and Police Out of Our Communities! For a National movement  and Conference against Police Brutality!
(Photo Credit: REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

america-wakiewakie:

We All Are Ferguson! | La Voz

Protesters march and hold their fists aloft as they march during ongoing demonstrations in reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri August 16, 2014. Missouri Governor Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency and imposed a curfew in Ferguson on Saturday following a week-long series of racially charged protests and looting over the shooting of the unarmed black teenager by a white police officer.

Let’s Spread the Ferguson Rebellion and put an end to this Police Brutality Epidemic!

It’s been almost two weeks since the murder of 18 year old Michael Brown in  Ferguson, MO erupted into riots & protests against the racist police. Every 28 hours, a Black person is killed by police or other person acting as a vigilante. The Ferguson insurrection has sparked a flame that has only gotten brighter and shows little sign of withering away. It has galvanized not only Missouri, but also people in the U.S. and around the world.  An example that shows the solidarity and connection Ferguson shared with the world are the instances where Palestinians have been giving tips through social media on dealing with the police force’s daily barrage of tear gas and violence. It is no surprise on why the Black working class people and other oppressed sectors are revolted by the brutal nature of the racist police violence that the killing of Michael Brown represent. Though the apartheid-like system of Jim Crow formally ended with the democratic gains of the Civil Rights Movement of the 50s-60s, in reality it only changed its form. There has been a resurgence of a “new Jim Crow”, especially since the 1980s, when Reagan began to defund public education and increase prison incarceration. The US economic recession that started in 2008 has only increased the marginalization and criminalization of black people: unemployment,  poverty,  police brutality, among other things, have been the reality for the majority of the African American population, along with Latinos and other oppressed sectors .

All support and Solidarity with Ferguson protests!

It is no surprise why the response by the Ferguson black community has been large and rebellious. It is a small city with a population of 21,000, where almost 70% of the population is Black and authorities are almost all white. To cite just one example, only three of the 53 city police officers are black. The unemployment rate for black youth (16 to 24 years) is 47%, while for white youth it is 16%.  Moreover, Missouri was the last US state to abolish slavery. These figures start to paint a picture that is shared by the Black and Brown working class communities in most neighborhoods, ghettoes and projects of the nations elsewhere.  In fact, according to a report entitled “Operation Ghetto Storm”, by the  Malcolm X Grassroots Movement (an African Americans grassroots activist organization) “police officers, security guards, or self-appointed vigilantes extrajudicially killed  at least 313  African-Americans in  2012…This means a black person was killed by a security officer every 28 hours.” The militarized attack on the Ferguson protesters also added fuel to the indignation the community and the nation. The first night of the protests faced attack and repression by the local police, but more and more people showed up days/nights after. Protests have gone from hundreds to thousands, with some having more than 7000 people at the demonstrations. Local fast food workers, (who’ve been organizing for the Fight for 15$ minimum wage campaign and for unionization) other labor union members, ministers and church members, students, and many sectors have come out to join the protests in solidarity. St. Louis mayor and Missouri governor called out the National US Guard and put forward a curfew after midnight to repress and try to stop the protests, but the Ferguson people have shown courage in coming out to not be silenced, with the support of activists from other cities and states who came out to Ferguson to fight along. Workers’ Voice / La Voz de los Trabajadores supports Ferguson protests against police brutality and is involved in solidarity initiatives and demonstrations in different cities.

Obama rules for the 1%, not for black and working people!

The racist murder of Michael Brown was unfortunately another in a long series of murders by police or vigilantes in recent years. The two latest cases that shocked national public opinion were Trayvon Martin, murdered by a neighborhood vigilante in Florida in 2012 & Oscar Grant’s murder by police in Oakland in 2010. But there were hundreds of others, including Kendrec McDade (Pasadena, CA 2012), Ramarley Graham (Bronx, New York, 2012), Alan Blueford (Oakland, CA 2012), Andy Lopez (Santa Rosa, CA, 2013), Kimani Gray (Brooklyn, New York 2013) and the list goes on… In 2014 alone, different police forces have killed Ezell Ford (South Los Angeles, CA), Eric Garner (Staten Island, New York), Jacorey Calhoun (Oakland, CA), John Crawford III (Beavercreek, Ohio,), Dante Parker (Victorville, CA), Omar Abrego (South Los Angeles, CA) and Alex Nieto (San Francisco, CA). In most of these cases, murders generated a series of demonstrations at the time, but the murderer tended to be acquitted by the courts and not held accountable. This racist murder epidemic has not decreased since Obama’s election, quite the opposite, it continues to grow showing that the USA is still today a racist country in which Black and Latin@ youth are viewed as “potential criminals” by the white police and ruling class establishment. The protests against such violence also show that Obama’s hold on Black working class other sectors is dwindling, as few still believe today that the President is a “friend of Black folks”. On the opposite, his administration is continuing the war at home and abroad against those who are not, and will not be, considered as equal under capitalism.

For a National Movement Against Police Brutality!

The Ferguson rebellion continues, and we must follow their lead everywhere. We must build a national movement against police brutality. Too often struggles that erupt in response to police brutality are geographically confined to one city or small region. For example, in 1992, the Rodney King riots stayed in California and in 2009, the protests and riots in the wake of Oscar Grant’s murder by Oakland police did not expand beyond Oakland. Police brutality is not a local issue but is the result of a racist state that protects the 1%. Therefore, all of us who are struggling against police violence in our communities must unite with others doing the same in other parts of the country. This is the key to increasing our forces and multiplying our power. A movement that unites youth walking out of high schools, colleges, and universities across the country, and workers doing the same in their factories and workplaces on a national scale is what is needed to make a dent against the state of daily oppression and exploitation that the Black and Brown working class face today. For us socialists, police brutality against Black and Brown are an attack against the working class as a whole- as it keeps us divided and unable to unite in struggle against the 1 %, the ruling class. This became apparent in the Occupy movement that had to struggle with divisions due to race and gender conflicts. In this struggle against the worst manifestations of racism, we must bring into our ranks white, Asian/Pacific Islander, Latin@ and Black workers. In addiiton, we must mobilize the labor unions and demand from the AFL-CIO and the “Change to Win Coalition” to take a real stand against the government´s extreme complicity with police brutality. To build a national movement against police brutality, specifically one with working class independence and a clear anti-racist stand, it would mean reaching out to activists and organizations fighting against police violence in places in all major cities affected by the recent police violence, learning from their struggles, and informing them of ours. But we also need to appeal to all unions and union federations to unite in this fight. To facilitate this process, Workers’ Voice /La Voz de los Trabajadores encourages the idea of holding a National Conference against Police Brutality. With such a conference, we could establish a national network that could distribute information about incidences of police brutality and coordinate strategy and actions against such episodes nationwide.

Stop all Police Brutality!
Trial and Punishment for the Michael Brown Murderers!
Free all arrested protesters and drop all charges!
National Guard and Police Out of Our Communities!
For a National movement  and Conference against Police Brutality!

(Photo Credit: REUTERS/Lucas Jackson)

maneth985:

harzilla:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

-

maneth985:

harzilla:

fallen-angel-with-a-shotgun:

dajo42:

if you dont have me on facebook you are probably not missing out on any posts but the comment section is important too lmao

I went to the Renaissance faire dressed as a warrior.  I had a real sword with me, too.  I was standing (in character) next to a sword-fighting ring, where kids of all ages got the chance to pick up a sword and challenge the champion.  Some woman walks by, with her little girl.  The girl starts walking towards the ring, saying she wants to fight.  But the mom pulled her away hella sharply, and was like, “That’s for boys.”  You don’t want to be a BOY, do you?”    And the girl looked around and saw me.  I think she thought I was a boy; I had my hair in a ponytail, and was wearing a hood.  So she comes up to me and asks me, “Do you think girls can be fighters, too?”  And her mom looks like she’s silently gloating.  Like she thinks I’m going to say no.  So I take off my hood, untie my hair so that it flows freely, and kneel before her.  And I’m like, “Milady, anyone can be a fighter.”  I swear, the look on that mother’s face made my day.

-

Pick A Disney Princess Challenge: Favorite Outfit.

"Tale as old as time, song as old as rhyme, beauty and the beast."